Why Your Water Bill Is Higher and What to Do About It

By August 20, 2018Blog
Water Bills High?

Water Bills High?

Part of being a property owner is constantly managing costs, not just the costs of buying the property, but the costs of upkeep, maintenance, and beyond. Lawn care, property taxes, housing association fees, these can all be headaches to deal with on a monthly basis, but one thing you can’t neglect is the utilities. One thing about utility bills that can be frustrating is that if you end up having to pay more for some reason, you’re probably not going to find out until the bill comes due. After your initial shock, it’s important that you figure out exactly what is behind your higher water bill, for example. Here are some potential culprits.

For a start, let’s talk about the direct effects that a household can have on their own water bill. For example, something as simple as leaving the faucet on by brushing your teeth, or getting in the habit of taking extra-long showers after a hard day’s work can leave an impact on your water bill over a prolonged period of time. While chances are that these aren’t costing you tons of money, fixing the issue is absolutely free. If you have a lot of wasteful water habits, this can mean free savings by changing things up.

Another similar example is making sure that you’re monitoring new equipment and appliances that may indirectly add to your water bill. There are a lot of different additions that can fall under this category, like

  • Pools
  • Washing machines
  • Sprinkler systems
  • Freezers

In some cases, buying a newer one of these items may mean more power, but also more water consumption. Be sure to look at your water bill the month after you install one of these and see how much change there is. By the same token, you may have the occasional seasonal increase of your water bill, like from tending to your garden in summer. In addition, sudden household changes may change the amount of money that you spend without thinking. For example, when children are home for the summer or someone moves in for an extended period of time, this will increase the amount of water use that you have.

However, the most drastic things that will suddenly drive up your water bills are issues with the plumbing. The single most common cause of sudden high water bills is continuous water flow from your toilet, which can lead to as much as 200 gallons    a day lost and a massive spike in a household’s water use. In some cases, it’s easy to detect a leak, like if you see a dripping faucet or running toilet. However, other leaks may be more subtle.

One major example of this is outdoor leaks. A leak in the sprinkler system, for example, can be easily seen due to puddles and wetness in the yard. However, there are other leaks that may be harder to catch, like those under the home or between the water meter and the home. There are also other occasional parts of your home that can develop a leak, like a water heater, but these are rarer. Ideally, you’ll want to slowly and thoroughly check for leaks across the home when you first see a huge water bill. This applies doubly when talking about irrigation systems, as these tend to govern a lot of water use during the summer, and one broken part could lead to a lot of water getting wasted. This can include irrigation valves sticking on or timers not being properly programmed.

In some cases, cutting down on your utility expenses is a matter of making a few lifestyle changes or being more conscious of your usage. In other situations, it’s due to things that are out of your control, and it’s in situations like these that you want to act as fast as possible. For example, if leaks are behind your water bill woes, make sure you find plumbing professionals in Miami to attend to them quickly. At Hernandez Plumbing in Miami, we can find the leaks that are driving up your water bill and handle them quickly. This experience and expertise is built up over time—we’re a 3rd generation family-owned business that’s been around since 1972.

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